Coming this Purim: A Tribute to Aretha Franklin

You know, I heard that Aretha Franklin’s funeral was eight hours long. EIGHT!!!!!

To be fair, the program was scheduled for 6 hours, so they were only over by 25% or so.
I guess they needed time for:  Faith Hill, Ariana Grande, Jennifer Hudson, Stevie Wonder Ron Isley, Chaka Khan, Yolanda Adams, Marvin Sapp, the Clark Sisters, Jennifer Holliday and Franklin’s son.

In addition, there were speeches from President Bill Clinton, Smokey Robinson, the Rev. Jesse Jackson and Clive Davis, among others.

It was certainly a funeral and tribute befitting a queen.
And so will our Megillah Madness this year, which is entitled. “A Tribute to Aretha Franklin and Motown.” Continue reading →

Posted by Hazzan Asa Fradkin in Hazzan Asa Fradkin, 0 comments

Hanukkah in Green

Military service members lighting Chanukah candles while deployed

The fifth week of the month is a wildcard in our blog schedule.  As Hanukkah begins this Sunday night, let’s think about the holiday from a new angle.  Jewish service members are deployed around the globe this Hanukkah.  Hopefully they will be able to enjoy a jelly donut, light the candles and appreciate their role in securing our freedoms… including the freedom to be proudly Jewish as the ancient Maccabees did long ago.

 

 

How the U.S. military‏ got a taste of Hanukkah miracles

By David Geffen

11/28/2018

Jerusalem Post

When Dov Peretz Elkins was ordained a rabbi at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1964, he entered the US Army as a chaplain and was assigned to Fort Gordon, just outside of Augusta, Georgia. Elkins, who made aliyah with his wife Maxine several years ago, recently reminisced about developing a Hanukkah program for 18- and 19-year-old trainees from New York who were the majority of the Jewish personnel at his installation.

“These young men, drafted just after they finished high school, were away from home for the first time in their lives. This was a half a century ago, long before most Jewish high schoolers traveled extensively in their teens as they do now. The Jewish chaplain had his work cut out for him. Since these soldiers were searching for something to fill their lives, I was presented with an opportunity to touch them Jewishly.”

Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Greg Harris in Guest Post, Rabbi Greg Harris, 0 comments

Thankful Traditions

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. 

Judaism is filled with traditions.  Some are public events in synagogues while many more are family focused activities at home.  Thanksgiving is an American holiday filled with bountiful opportunities to create ‘Jewish’ moments at home.  As American Jews, we have many reasons to be grateful.  A Jewish moment may be reciting motzei over the crescent rolls thus marking the special meal but we can also be intentional in creating family experiences of thankfulness. Click here for a prayer written by Rabbi Debra Cantor which you can use at your table.  Below is also a blog by Cambria Bold about setting new rituals for Thanksgiving.  While it is not explicitly Jewish, many of the moments she writes about are exactly how we can use Shabbat each week.

Let’s cherish our time with family and friends this Thanksgiving and Shabbat the next evening. Whatever your plans are for the holiday, be grateful, be generous, and be proud to be living in America. Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Greg Harris in Guest Post, Rabbi Greg Harris, 0 comments

Why Jews

Why Jews?

Where do we get the name “Jew”? What is the origin?

In this week’s parasha we will read about the beginning of the Jewish nation. Jacob will have twelve sons and one daughter and with them come the first steps of our people. But, why “Jews”?

Later in history the twelve tribes will be divided in two kingdoms, Israel in the north and Judah in the south. The northern tribes will disappear and basically we are all descendants of the tribe of Judah (Cohanim and Leviim are the exception; they are descendants of the tribe of Levi but that is for another post).

We are called Jews (Yehudim) since we descend from Judah (Yehudah). Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Fabián Werbin in Rabbi Fabián Werbin, 0 comments

A New Chorus!

The other day, Rabbi Harris came into my office during a rehearsal and said, “please quiet down, I think people are having way too much fun in here!”

Some of you may know that back in Connecticut I ran a teen choir for 9 years that performed locally at Shabbat services and traveled nationally as well.

It was featured, at one point, in a promotional video for the Cantors assembly.  https://www.asafradkin.com/watch ( look for “Singing Is Just The Beginning”

It was the highlight of my time in Greenwich and the bonds I formed with those kids remain incredibly special to me.

When I came to Beth El I was amazed that we already had our own a capella teen choir, Marak HaYom, a stellar self run group of High School kids that meet for a few hours each Sunday. Continue reading →

Posted by Hazzan Asa Fradkin in Hazzan Asa Fradkin, 0 comments

Proud to be Jewish

I am proud to be Jewish, even in these difficult days.

In these past days, I have cried with people and sometimes hugged when words felt inadequate. Rabbi Werbin, Hazzan Fradkin and I have spent time with Beth El students and adults responding to the tragedy in Pittsburgh.  We have had gatherings in the sanctuary and conversations in the hallways. We have sung, prayed and been silent together in response.

Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Greg Harris in Rabbi Greg Harris, 0 comments

Seeing Beyond God’s Gender

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. 

I am bringing a blog by Dr. Joy Ladin who is the Gottesman Professor of English at Yeshiva University.  Reflecting on her own journey with gender, she invites us to see God in an expanded way – beyond the language of He or Him.  As I read this, I am reminded how people are continually able to find themselves reflected in the Tanach.   Our sacred texts can inspire, comfort, and nurture a sense of belonging when we invest ourselves in our ancient verses.

Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Greg Harris in Guest Post, Rabbi Greg Harris, 0 comments

Make your own list

checklist.jpgSometimes we get so immersed in our routine, our daily life, and the many things that occupy our minds, that we lose sight of the blessings that surround us. When we drive our cars, it is difficult to look up and enjoy the beauty of the sky, appreciate the blue jays and the cardinals or just observe how the trees dance with the wind.

As we transition into the fall and the trees around us start to change their colors, I wanted to take a minute and reflect about the beauty of the place we live in.

When it’s time for me to think deeply, the Talmud is always one of my first resources. Through its statements, teachings and anecdotes, we can discover what was essential to our ancestors almost 2,000 years ago.

We read in the Babylonian Talmud (Sanhedrin 17B)

“It has been taught: A scholar should not reside in a city where the following ten things are not found: Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Fabián Werbin in Rabbi Fabián Werbin, 1 comment

Two Songs, One Message and the power of children singing

So I was sitting in my office one day with a teen who is involved in our High School A Capella group, Marak Hayom ( Soup of the Day).

We were discussing their upcoming repertoire for the year and I asked if she’d heard this version of Hashem Melech by the Y-Studs A Capella group.

I start to  play the video and she says “This sounds familiar”. I say “Yeah, it came out a few years ago as an Israeli pop song by Gad Elbaz.” She says “ No, I’m pretty sure I had to learn this song for a 7thgrade Spanish class.”   After I rearranged my puzzled expression , she said she was pretty sure it’s a Mark Anthony song. Continue reading →

Posted by Hazzan Asa Fradkin in Hazzan Asa Fradkin, 0 comments

An Embracing Look at Ourselves

During the High Holidays, I enjoy looking at the kahal (community) gathered.  I clearly recall how I felt during my first Rosh Hashana at Beth El and how many strangers were before me.  Over many years  I have been invited into so many people’s lives.  In quiet moments on the bimah, I reflect on the experiences I have shared with people – high points and low points, children’s weddings and parent’s funerals, first steps of a baby and first times at the Torah.  These are the most special parts of being clergy.

One aspect of our community which I have been thinking about is how we embrace all Beth El families – ‘traditional’ families and  ‘non-traditional’ families.  Families of one adult who is a parent by choice (maybe through adoption or IVF) or by circumstance (by divorce or death of partner) or a single adult member.

For the past year and a half, I have been working with Beth El leadership to review our congregation’s practices and policies to assure they reflect our embracing values and bring clarity to our ritual practices.  This focus has been on households where Judaism and another faith is present.  Continue reading →

Posted by Rabbi Greg Harris in Rabbi Greg Harris, 0 comments