Rabbi Greg Harris

Hanukkah in Green

Military service members lighting Chanukah candles while deployed

The fifth week of the month is a wildcard in our blog schedule.  As Hanukkah begins this Sunday night, let’s think about the holiday from a new angle.  Jewish service members are deployed around the globe this Hanukkah.  Hopefully they will be able to enjoy a jelly donut, light the candles and appreciate their role in securing our freedoms… including the freedom to be proudly Jewish as the ancient Maccabees did long ago.

 

 

How the U.S. military‏ got a taste of Hanukkah miracles

By David Geffen

11/28/2018

Jerusalem Post

When Dov Peretz Elkins was ordained a rabbi at the Jewish Theological Seminary of America in 1964, he entered the US Army as a chaplain and was assigned to Fort Gordon, just outside of Augusta, Georgia. Elkins, who made aliyah with his wife Maxine several years ago, recently reminisced about developing a Hanukkah program for 18- and 19-year-old trainees from New York who were the majority of the Jewish personnel at his installation.

“These young men, drafted just after they finished high school, were away from home for the first time in their lives. This was a half a century ago, long before most Jewish high schoolers traveled extensively in their teens as they do now. The Jewish chaplain had his work cut out for him. Since these soldiers were searching for something to fill their lives, I was presented with an opportunity to touch them Jewishly.”

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Thankful Traditions

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. 

Judaism is filled with traditions.  Some are public events in synagogues while many more are family focused activities at home.  Thanksgiving is an American holiday filled with bountiful opportunities to create ‘Jewish’ moments at home.  As American Jews, we have many reasons to be grateful.  A Jewish moment may be reciting motzei over the crescent rolls thus marking the special meal but we can also be intentional in creating family experiences of thankfulness. Click here for a prayer written by Rabbi Debra Cantor which you can use at your table.  Below is also a blog by Cambria Bold about setting new rituals for Thanksgiving.  While it is not explicitly Jewish, many of the moments she writes about are exactly how we can use Shabbat each week.

Let’s cherish our time with family and friends this Thanksgiving and Shabbat the next evening. Whatever your plans are for the holiday, be grateful, be generous, and be proud to be living in America. Continue reading →

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Proud to be Jewish

I am proud to be Jewish, even in these difficult days.

In these past days, I have cried with people and sometimes hugged when words felt inadequate. Rabbi Werbin, Hazzan Fradkin and I have spent time with Beth El students and adults responding to the tragedy in Pittsburgh.  We have had gatherings in the sanctuary and conversations in the hallways. We have sung, prayed and been silent together in response.

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Seeing Beyond God’s Gender

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. 

I am bringing a blog by Dr. Joy Ladin who is the Gottesman Professor of English at Yeshiva University.  Reflecting on her own journey with gender, she invites us to see God in an expanded way – beyond the language of He or Him.  As I read this, I am reminded how people are continually able to find themselves reflected in the Tanach.   Our sacred texts can inspire, comfort, and nurture a sense of belonging when we invest ourselves in our ancient verses.

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An Embracing Look at Ourselves

During the High Holidays, I enjoy looking at the kahal (community) gathered.  I clearly recall how I felt during my first Rosh Hashana at Beth El and how many strangers were before me.  Over many years  I have been invited into so many people’s lives.  In quiet moments on the bimah, I reflect on the experiences I have shared with people – high points and low points, children’s weddings and parent’s funerals, first steps of a baby and first times at the Torah.  These are the most special parts of being clergy.

One aspect of our community which I have been thinking about is how we embrace all Beth El families – ‘traditional’ families and  ‘non-traditional’ families.  Families of one adult who is a parent by choice (maybe through adoption or IVF) or by circumstance (by divorce or death of partner) or a single adult member.

For the past year and a half, I have been working with Beth El leadership to review our congregation’s practices and policies to assure they reflect our embracing values and bring clarity to our ritual practices.  This focus has been on households where Judaism and another faith is present.  Continue reading →

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It Didn’t Always Rain on Sukkot

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. 

This year feels like a Sukkah Wash-Out… but it didn’t always rain.  Below is a 2014 Sukkot reflection from Rabbi Rachel Barenblat who has been blogging as the Velveteen Rabbi since 2003.  Her blog takes on many current issues.  She lives in western Massachusetts.

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Shana Tova from the Clergy

The joke always goes ‘Rabbi / Hazzan, Rosh Hashanah is so early (or late) this year.’ Of course Rosh Hashanah is never early or late. The holiday is always the first of Tishrei. Maybe it is September which keeps moving?

The ‘early or late’ dilemma makes sense from the usual mileposts of time we commonly use – Labor Day, schools beginning, and shifts in weather. For the next four weeks though, Judaism asks us to shift how we organize time. Aware of the hectic schedules and demands of our lives, Judaism is giving us a gift of re-organizing time. In the weeks ahead, we can incorporate into our lives the spiritual moments these beautiful holidays offer. Continue reading →

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Welcoming a Refugee Family

Throughout the Torah, the Israelites are reminded “you know the feelings of a stranger, for you were strangers in the land of Egypt” (Ex 23:9)  Thirty-six times in the Torah and throughout our rituals, we are reminded of our ancestors’ hardships in Egypt.  These reminders are prompts for us to extend kindness and welcome others in need.

In close partnership with our friends at Bethesda United Methodist Church and Saint Mark Presbyterian Church, we are excited to be able to fulfill this special mitzvah.  In two weeks, we will welcome a refugee family into our communities.

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Unicorns in the Hebraic Section of the Library of Congress

The Reading Room at the Jefferson Building of the Library of Congress

One of my favorite places in all of Washington, D.C. is the Library of Congress.  My first visit was in 1981 and it has been a recurring joy and fascination for me ever since.  While on sabbatical a number of years ago, I chose to immerse myself within the riches of the Library’s Hebraic Section.  Below is a fascinating blog by Dr. Anchi Hoh, about unicorns (seriously) hidden within the library stacks.

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders drawn from throughout the Jewish world. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter.

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Getting (Re)Grounded at the Ballpark

Rabbi Harris with the Syracuse Chiefs’ mascot, Pops

I am writing this blog from Syracuse, NY.  I am not visiting the Carrier Dome or participating in the 2018 US Bowling Congress Championship (yes, that is actually a thing taking place in Syracuse).  I am in the midst of a road trip visiting baseball stadiums large and small.  It is my chance to unplug for a few days, enjoy some baseball and many points of interest between the towns.  This year my trip has included Pittsburgh, Buffalo, Syracuse and will end in Hartford.  The side trips have included Deep Creek Lake, Niagara Falls, Seneca Falls, the Andy Warhol museum, a Segway tour, the Women’s Rights National Historical Park, walking into a few unexpected restaurants to listen to music and lots of quiet time.  To answer your questions: yes, I have done this before and yes, I go alone. (Thank you Rebekah!)

It takes a few days on the road to quiet my mind.  I have learned to guard against overly filling my vacation schedule with too many activities, plans and schedules.  When I overschedule my vacation, the gift I intend to offer myself never materializes.  It is the gift of being able to listen and reconnect with myself.  Continue reading →

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