Guest Post

Resilience During Extraordinary Times

This is an extraordinary time – COVID-19, economic uncertainty, schools and businesses indefinitely closed, social distancing and isolation.  As this is the fourth week of the month, Reflections Off the Bimah features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter.

Next week I will reflect on Passover and how to do / experience sedarim during social distancing.  This week though, I want to share two messages of hope to help us see beyond the stresses and pressures of the immediate.  First is a beautiful musical piece by Andy Grammer who is singing with the Palestinian – Israeli Jerusalem Youth Chorus (JYC), “Don’t Give Up on Me”.  The JYC was founded by Micah Hendler who grew up at Beth El.  (Click here to see more of Micah’s incredible work.) JYC brings together Israelis and Palestinian youth to forge common ground through music. Their music gives voice to seeing the world beyond the immediate.

The second piece is from Rabbi Chanan Morrison who has written extensively on Rav Abraham Isaac Kook (1865 – 1935), the first Ashkenazi Chief Rabbi of British Mandate Palestine. Rav Kook’s message is to be cautious but not to fear.  Morrison channels Kook’s message as finding “resilience that we need to persevere in challenging times.”  Continue reading →

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Reflections on Three AIPACs

Rabbi Adam Kligfeld

This is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. I share this Facebook post (2.25.20) from Rabbi Adam Kligfeld, Senior Rabbi at Temple Beth Am in Los Angeles.  We look forward to joining him at AIPAC’s Policy Conference next week.  Rabbi Kligfeld wrote:

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Anti-Semitism: Searching for a Global Response

Antisemitic image portraying a Jewish shopkeeper as greedy and devious

This is the fifth week of the month and allows for another outside blog. I am focusing this week’s blog on the relentless scourge of anti-semitism.  The hatred of the Jewish People and its morphing into the hatred of the State of Israel continues to be dangerous around the world.  From college campuses in America to grocery stores in France and synagogues being attacked around the globe, antisemitism persists.  It incorporates overt attacks and subtle acts of hate and bias.  Below are resources shared by the European group – the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe (OSCE) to challenge anti-semitism.  They have been produced in multiple languages.  I share these because this Sunday, I will be traveling to Tirana, Albania to attend the OSCE’s international conference on combating anti-semitism.  I have been invited as a delegate to speak about security measures in American synagogues as well as the robust efforts to nurture interfaith dialogue and cooperation.  Beth El is vigilant in both these arenas. 

Continue reading →

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The Ordinariness of Auschwitz

Image not part of original blog post

This is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. As yesterday was the 75th anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz, I share this blog by Alex Benjamin published in “The Times of Israel.”  Benjamin is the director of EIPA, a multi-disciplined pro-Israel advocacy group based in Brussels, with offices in Paris and Berlin.

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Sorkin Teen Trip 2019

This is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. This week’s guest article comes from our very own Tali Moscowitz, who is currently in Israel with Hazzan Fradkin and 12 students who are participating in our annual Sorkin Teen Trip to Israel.


 

“The universe is celebrated through acts.”
-Quote found on Tel Aviv Graffiti

Shalom from Israel! Hazzan Fradkin and I are currently here on the second annual Sorkin Teen Trip with 12 students from this year’s Religious School 10th grade confirmation class. This experience has been realized in part due to the incredible generosity of Beth El members. In just the last week, these teenagers have cultivated an understanding of the people, culture, sights, sounds, and tastes of Israel.

 

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Why Jews Love Thanksgiving

This is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. I share this article by Ruth Kaplan published last year in “Jewish Boston.”  May you have a grateful Thanksgiving!

 

November 26, 2018

By Ruth Kaplan

The most obvious reason? It’s the great equalizer—we are all invited to the party!

Thanksgiving seems to be the most popular American holiday for Jews. The most obvious reason? It’s the great equalizer—we are all invited to the party! Ironically, it has come to be regarded as the kickoff to the “holiday season,” which, of course, refers to the all-pervasive Christmas, with a touch of Hanukkah on the side.

Now, of course, there are many Jewish people who are not the least bit bothered by the Christmas season and don’t feel at all excluded. I just don’t happen to be among them. For me, Christmas makes me feel like “the other.” Despite guarantees of religious freedom, the reality is that, culturally, the United States is a majority Christian country, and during the Christmas season, I feel like I’m “not invited to the party,” even though I’m generally invited to and attend seasonal parties. But a part of me always sees myself from the outside looking in: I don’t have a tree, I don’t buy poinsettias or a wreath and I quickly tire of Christmas music on elevators. Bah, humbug!

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Shana Tova 5780

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. I share this article from the Times of Israel as Rosh Hashanah begins Sunday night.

Let me also add that the entire clergy team and staff wish you a meaningful holiday season.  We hope you will join us not only in services but in many other events too.  Our synagogue is a vibrant community with numerous access points so we want to help you find yours.

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We Have to Rethink Elul

This is the fifth week of the month and allows for another outside blog.  As Saturday and Sunday begin the month of Elul, I offer this blog by Alon Goshen-Gottstein which was originally published in the Times of Israel (ToI). The ToI describes him as the founder and director of the Elijah Interfaith Institute. He is acknowledged as one of the world’s leading figures in interreligious dialogue, specializing in bridging the theological and academic dimension with a variety of practical initiatives, especially involving world religious leadership. to give a deeper framing of the month of preparation for the High Holidays.

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The Educational Benefits of Taking Kids to Museums

Click to enlarge.

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter.  I share this blog after spending an afternoon with my daughters at the Boston Museum of Fine Art.  From mummies to Monet, the galleries prompted conversations about creativity, personal expression, modalities of expression, individual tastes, sources of inspirations and more. The museum staff created a fabulous bingo game for families to explore the museum. This “game” allowed the entire family to experience the museum’s vast collections.  Whether you are visiting The Jewish Museum in New York, the National Museum of American Jewish History in Philadelphia or the Jewish Historical Museum in D.C. when it reopens, don’t let the summer be the only time you explore the treasures held in the collections.  Of course, the greatest treasure will be the conversations you will have inspired by the museum’s objects.

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Intermarried Jews are not a Second Holocaust

This week is the fourth week of the month. For Reflections Off the Bimah, the fourth week features thought leaders from throughout the Jewish world and beyond. These special posts give you the opportunity to consider important opinions you may not readily encounter. Rabbi Shmuly Yanklowitz is an Orthodox rabbi in Phoenix, AZ.  In 2012 and 2013, he was named one of the 50 most influential rabbis in America by Newsweek and The Daily Beast.  Rabbi Yanklowitz was featured in a 2018 Reflections Off the Bimah post titled “Donating Life” about the importance of organ donation.  This post was in response to the statement of Israeli Minister of Education Rafi Peretz. At Beth El, we continue to embrace and support all families committed to building a Jewish home.

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